Book Review: The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One by Amanda Lovelace

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The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One by Amanda Lovelace
Published: 2018
Genre: Poetry
Format: Paperback
Pages: 192
Source: Library
Date Read: January 17, 2019
Grade: B+
Synopsis: The witch: supernaturally powerful, inscrutably independent, and now—indestructible. These moving, relatable poems encourage resilience and embolden women to take control of their own stories. Enemies try to judge, oppress, and marginalize her, but the witch doesn’t burn in this one. Continue reading “Book Review: The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One by Amanda Lovelace”

Book Review: No Matter the Wreckage by Sarah Kay

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No Matter the Wreckage by Sarah Kay
Published: 2014
Genre: Poetry
Format: Paperback
Pages: 143
Source: Library
Dates Read: January 3-5, 2019
Grade: B+
Synopsis: A collection of heartfelt — at times striking — poems highlighting family, love, loss, history, and more. Continue reading “Book Review: No Matter the Wreckage by Sarah Kay”

Book Review: Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai

ioabaInside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai
Published: 2011
Genre: CH
Format: Kindle
Pages: 277
Source: Library
Dates Read: June 20-27, 2018
Grade: A-
Synopsis: A young Vietnamese girl and her family escape their war-torn country and leave for Alabama in the U.S., discovering a whole new life and the strength they must find within themselves.

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Book Review: Virgin by Analicia Sotelo

vTitle: Virgin
Author: Analicia Sotelo
Published: 2018
Genre: P
Format: Paperback
Pages: 95
Source: Library
Date Read: April 11, 2018
Grade: C+
Synopsis: Selected by Ross Gay as winner of the inaugural Jake Adam York Prize, Analicia Sotelo’s debut collection of poems is a vivid portrait of the artist as a young woman.

In Virgin, Sotelo walks the line between autobiography and myth-making, offering up identities like dishes at a feast. These poems devour and complicate tropes of femininity–of naiveté, of careless abandon–before sharply exploring the intelligence and fortitude of women, how “far & wide, / how dark & deep / this frigid female mind can go.” At every step, Sotelo’s poems seduce with history, folklore, and sensory detail–grilled meat, golden habaneros, and burnt sugar–before delivering clear-eyed and eviscerating insights into power, deceit, relationships, and ourselves.

Blistering and gorgeous, Virgin is an audacious act of imaginative self-mythology from one of our most promising young poets.

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Book Review: The Undressing by Li-Young Lee

tuTitle: The Undressing
Author: Li-Young Lee
Published: 2018
Genre: P
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 96
Source: Library
Date Read: March 25, 2018
Grade: A
Synopsis: The Undressing is a tonic for spiritual anemia; it attempts to uncover things hidden since the dawn of the world. Short of achieving that end, these mysterious, unassuming poems investigate the human violence and dispossession increasingly prevalent around the world, as well as the horrors the poet grew up with as a child of refugees. Lee draws from disparate sources, including the Old Testament, the Dao De Jing, and the music of the Wu Tang Clan. While the ostensive subjects of these layered, impassioned poems are wide-ranging, their driving engine is a burning need to understand our collective human mission.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Undressing by Li-Young Lee”